Style and sartorial elegance… a sustainable option…

Inspired by the New Year sustainable resolution ‘ditch disposable fashion’, a pop-up sustainable clothes sale pitched up on Tuesday 7th March, organised by The Language Centre Green Impact Team.

It drew colleagues and students wishing to renew and refresh their wardrobe with ‘new’ favourites. Similarly, the pre-loved garments were looking for new loves who would adore and carry them with a new swagger.

The boutique style space contained timeless fashions from the 90s to the present day which included spring and summer tops and skirts as well as formal and informal party wear. Plenty of gems from quality brands such as Whistles, Reiss, Jigsaw, Karen Millen and Hobbs including designer were on offer for bargain prices to the delight of the consumer.

Thanks to the co-operation of colleagues and students the whole event was organised in less than 10 days. It was a case of all hands to the deck with respect to organising publicity and ensuring there were sufficient quality items to sell. The funds raised were donated to the charities ‘Friends of Peru’ and ‘Survival International’.

A couple of tips for anyone organising a similar event – ensure there is something for the discerning male… a few disappointed customers resulted when they realised the stylish Calvin Klein shirts were for chic women and not dapper men. A wider variety of sizes is also encouraged to ensure all shoppers leave happy.

A huge thank you to everyone who contributed and shopped in the ‘pop-up sustainable boutique’.
(Kashmir Kaur)

Into University: Wildlife Friendly Garden Student Design Project

Into University: Wildlife Friendly Garden Student Design Project

The Sustainability Service have begun working with IntoUniversity Primary Student Council on a very exciting new project to support the students in designing and campaigning for a wildlife friendly outdoor learning garden on a patch of greenspace at the Beeston Centre. IntoUniversity provides local learning centres where young people are inspired to achieve, the centres offer an innovative programme that supports young people from disadvantaged backgrounds to attain either a university place or another chosen aspiration.

So far, we have run 2 workshops as part of the co-design interactive design process we are following to work alongside the students to create the final scheme proposals. We began with biodiversity bingo to get the Student Council thinking about the different types of habitat that they could design in their garden to attract a variety of urban wildlife. The students then worked in project teams and started to sketch out 2D design layouts. This included mapping out which elements would be included in their designs to create an exciting wildlife friendly space including bug hotels, bee friendly flowers, bird boxes, fruit trees, compost patches, vegetable beds, hedges and trees. The students were also keen that the space could also be used an outdoor classroom space which they could use when coming to the Centre for their academic support sessions.

On Friday, our workshop helped to develop the student designs ideas further with an interactive 3D elements workshop based on ‘planning for real’ principles, modelling 3D design from the 2D garden layout maps. The idea was to ‘test out’ design ideas for real and see if they really worked when modelled in 3D elements. We put our crafty creative skills to work with the children to create trees with sponge and cocktail sticks, ponds and reed beds from felt and tissue paper, bug hotels with lolly sticks and lots more! We were so impressed with how creative and diverse the ideas were and we think we have found some very talented landscape designers at the Into University Beeston Centre.

The next steps for this project are for the final design to be created based on the merging all of the student ideas and supporting the IntoUniversity primary and secondary school councils with a fundraising campaign to help get the project on the ground. It’s very exciting and something we are looking forward to being a part of!

Here are some photos from the workshops:

 

Photos: IntoUniversity students working on their designs in 2D & 3D elements co-design workshops. Credit: IntoUniversity.

Student Conference on Sustainable Futures 2017

On Friday 3rd February 2017, The University of Leeds hosted its first Student Conference on Sustainable Futures – Sustainable Perspectives on Future Challenges. The event highlighted the rich diversity of sustainability research and curricular projects, from students at all levels, across all disciplines.
With over 100 delegates and 40 student presenters representing every faculty, the day was filled with a medley of posters, talks and conversation workshops covering such topics as; using biomimicry to reduce the need for unsustainable textile dyes, integrating low carbon energy solutions for remote rural areas, analysing extinction rates in marine micro-organisms, and tackling social inequalities in accessing higher education.
To open the event Professor Tom Ward – Deputy Vice Chancellor for Student Education, delivered an inspiring introduction to the importance of embedding sustainability at Leeds and its place in everyone’s lives. He commented –
“This agenda will shape your future, be part of the sustainability society.”

Following a quick coffee and with twitter hashtags at the ready, attendees made their way to Parkinson Court where student’s posters, art pieces, and digital presentations were being displayed. It was amazing! Engineers were talking with artists, biologists  conversing with sociologists, business students debating with geographers. The room was echoing with collaborative discussions.
The exhibition was open all day, drawing in passer-bys with photos of Antarctic expeditions, videos of magnified crystals depicting Earth’s finite resources, and posters detailing some of the future global challenges we face.

A busy hour of oral presentations was next on the agenda, kicking off with sessions covering aspects of sustainability within Cities, Communication, Society, and Biodiversity. Ample time for questions from the audience allowed discussions to breathe and gave presenters an insight into the minds of non-specialists on their subject.

A vegetarian feast of locally sourced, low carbon grub provided by Great Food at Leeds, awaited the rumbling stomachs of the conference crowd. The delicious spread hit the spot and attracted hugely positive feedback (the brie and cranberry wontons went down a treat!)

Conversation sessions brought an interactive element to the day, with ‘Re(act) on Sustainability’ getting people out of their chairs and expressing the complexities of sustainable behaviors through performance art. Down the hallway, the ‘Community engagement within the curriculum’ workshop explored the benefits and challenges of sustainability in the community and peoples thoughts on how this can be expanded.

Afternoon oral sessions continued with familiar themes of Communication, and Society, but were also joined by Innovation and Technology, Food and Agriculture, and Governance and Policy. Such varying and fascinating presentations saw people struggling to decide which to attend! From the role of sustainable menstrual products for female empowerment, to present challenges in connecting Indian farmers, and exploring young consumers perceptions of fast fashion.

The awards ceremony, to celebrate the exemplary posters submitted to the conference, brought the day to a close. Head of Sustainability at the University of Leeds, Dr. Louise Ellis, gave a roundup of the fantastic work from the day and praised the diversity and delivery of student’s projects.

Professor Lisa Roberts – Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation lead the awards ceremony. Winners and highly recommended awards went to:

Most Original Concept
Highly Commended
Mary Loveday Edwards

‘The Use of Nostalgia at the Ideation Stage of Permaculture Design’
Winner
Clare Martynski

‘The Role of Performance and Live Art in Transforming World views’

Most Effective Visuals
Highly Commended
Katie Thomas

‘People and Nature In Harmony? Understanding a Consumer Ethical Dilemma’
Winner
Ana Perez
‘What We Know Affects What We Do – Exploring Fashion Sustainability and its Perception by Young Consumers’
Best Conference Poster
Highly Commended
Vishnu Sunil Kumar

‘To Tree or Not to Tree? Assessing Carbon Stock Distribution Along an Altitudinal Gradient in the Western Ghats’
Winner
Rizwana Alam 

‘The Governance of Urban Green Spaces: Challenges and a Way Forward to Sustainable Development’

Lisa concluded with a call to action to all who attended the conference, encouraging collaborative discussions, and to keep conversations in the fore regarding how research at Leeds must continue to address the key social, economic and environmental challenges of our time.

A huge thank you to all who were a part of the day. It was fantastic to see such a diverse turn out. We already looking forward to next year!

For more information on the Student Conference on Sustainable Futures, including posters and highlights of the day, please CLICK HERE

Campus Biodiversity Survey

Following the approval of the University’s Biodiversity Standard, the Sustainability Service asked for volunteers to help bring the organisation closer to achieving the ambition of becoming an exemplar of urban biodiversity.  To do this, volunteers were assigned a section of the campus to survey and to identify locations that may have potential to improve the habitat value to support urban wildlife.  These findings would then be used to start developing the new biodiversity action plan.

So on a cold but bright January afternoon I set off with a map, clipboard and coloured pencils to the Western Campus to survey the fairly substantial area around the Maurice Keyworth, Liberty, Charles Thackrah and Michael Marks Buildings.

The first stage was to use the Phase 1 habitat classification survey technique to record the current types of habitat in place, such as woodland, scrub, grassland, marsh, tall herb and fen.  The second stage was to identify and suggest biodiversity opportunities and improvements that could be made in this part of the campus.  For example, leaving grass to grow a little longer, planting hedgerows, swapping annual plants for perennial species which are better for bees, increasing tree cover, creating log piles for invertebrates and increasing shrub cover for smaller mammals.

I was impressed to discover that quite a few initiatives were already in place, including a log pile, bird feeders, a bee hotel and a wildflower meadow.  However, I was pleased to be able to make further suggestions such as areas suitable for growing creepers, putting in more log piles and bug hotels, and I even suggested one place suitable for making a pond!  I will look forward to seeing what developments arise once all of the surveys of the different parts of campus have been completed and put together.

Joanne Sutherland, SDDU

Bike Library Donation

In September we were contacted by the New Wortley Community Association Bike Library in Leeds to see if we had any bikes which could be donated to their project.  This scheme works with ex-offenders by teaching them how to repair old or broken bicycles, providing them with vital skills, a sense of purpose and a good focus. These bikes are then hired out to people across Leeds for a small fee, and those who cannot afford to pay can rent out the bicycles for free.  The project, which is part of the Yorkshire Bank’s Bike Libraries scheme, proved so popular that they were low on bikes and needed some more to be refurbished to add to their fleet.  Our campus bike hub had recently decommissioned several bikes from the hire fleet, and so we donated them to this great project which benefits the whole community and helps to provide a new lease of life to old bikes!

Here is our bike hub coordinator Steven with the New Wortley bike library team. We are looking forward to donating more bikes to this inspiring project next year.

Welcome to our new Sustainability Architects!

We’d like to give a warm welcome to the newest members of the Sustainability Service, Emma Weaver, Matt Morton, Gloria Koepke and Mumo Mutulili.

EMMA

Hello, I’m Emma one of the 2016/17 sustainable architects. I am a fourth year Textile Design student here at the University of Leeds. I am a creative individual with an inherent desire to give something back. I have a fascination for nature and its capabilities and I’m extremely excited by the “sustainability era” that surrounds us. My role as an architect gives me an opportunity to promote my passion to other students within a variety of disciplines throughout the University.

One of my main desires this year is to integrate sustainable knowledge to students, but mostly my intentions are to promote the potential and benefits of sustainability within student educations. My number one aim this year is to promote that our sustainable future doesn’t have to involve sacrifice. Instead, we should be recognising and benefiting from the innovative, revolutionary potential it presents us with.

I am very much looking forward to the year ahead, and hope to influence and inspire other students to get involved and benefit from this fascinating field.


MATT

Hello! My name is Matt and I’m one of four Sustainability Architects for 2016/17. I’m currently studying for an MSc in Sustainability and Consultancy here at Leeds. Following my environmental undergraduate degree, I decided I wanted to further my understanding of sustainability and the shared value it has for both business and society.

My duty as an architect is to diffuse the principles of the sustainability strategy throughout the University. The aspect of my role that I’m especially looking forward to is the opportunity to engage with a variety of students and staff members to find out what sustainability means to them. In the coming year, I aim to make sustainability accessible and achievable for a wider audience by highlighting its interdisciplinary and holistic nature – allowing individuals to be aware of how it can align with their existing learning. Through this, I hope that I can encourage it to be an integral part of people’s consciousness and empower them to be agents for sustainable change in their professional and personal lives.


GLORIA

Hi, I am Gloria, one of the four new sustainability architects. I am currently studying Mathematics as an Erasmus exchange student for one year here at the University of Leeds. After three years of studying I am thrilled to be actively getting involved with the real-world challenge of sustainability. Aside from studying various algebraic structures and proofing endless theorems, I enjoy sourcing the tastiest non-dairy milk and vegan Mousse au Chocolate recipes, experimenting with DIY cosmetic products, and I have previously volunteered for the nationwide German organisation “Foodsharing”. Since 2012 this organisation has prevented approximately 6,692,466 kg of food from being thrown in the garbage by collecting it from supermarkets and distributing it to the public for free!

Amazing projects are coming up at the University in 2017, such as the Student Conference on Sustainable Futures in February. Over the next semester, I want to investigate the challenges and possibilities students have making sustainable choices on campus by conducting one-week-long self-experiments.

MUMO

Hello, I’m Mumo and I’m part of the 2016-2017 Sustainability Architect’s team at the University. I am currently in my final year of an integrated Civil Engineering Masters degree. As a student studying Civil and Structural engineering, sustainability is at the fore front of my daily activities as I am trained to design and operate systems that use energy and resources sustainably, at a rate that does not compromise the natural environment.

I strive to make daily contributions to building a sustainable society by sharing my knowledge with my course mates, housemates and my family, ensuring that we use resources efficiently and effectively. I keep up with current news and information being shared from different parts of the globe in order to understand multiple views to solve sustainability challenges.

My aim as a sustainability Architect is to increase student and wider community participation on this vital subject, particularly focusing my efforts on efficient and effective use of resources. I am very excited to share my ideas and get the student community involved in this journey!

 

Keep up to date with all our architects on our website and social media pages!

We are now a Bike Friendly Business!

We are pleased to announce that the University of Leeds are now officially a City Connect Silver Accredited Bike Friendly Business!

Here is some of the judges feedback following our application:

“Well done on achieving Silver accreditation on your first assessment. It’s clear that University of Leeds takes cycling seriously and that you are committed to the continued promotion of cycling to your staff and visitors alike.” City Connect, Bike Friendly Business Team.

So what is Bike Friendly Business Accreditation?

“Currently, the majority of commuter journeys across our region are made by car, whilst only 1.5% of commuter journeys are made by bike. We have a congested, overburdened road network and this contributes to some of the country’s poorest air quality, with local drivers spending on average one day a year sitting in traffic. CityConnect’s Bike Friendly Business accreditation scheme, which complements the new Cycle Superhighway constructed between Bradford and Leeds, aims to help address this and offers support to local organisations who want to encourage more and more people to travel to their premises by bike, and also recognises the efforts of those who are already doing lots of things for people on bikes.” City Connect

How did the University of Leeds perform?

The University of Leeds applied to the CityConnect Bike Friendly Business scheme in order to have some external assessment carried out on all aspects of cycling in the University workplace in order to see what we were doing well and also where we could improve. The University were assessed facilities such as cycle parking, availability of cycle to work scheme and the wider support offered for staff such as availability of bike maintenance facilities and route planning advice, through an application form and a site visit. The assessment from City Connect took into consideration things such as the size of the organisation and other factors which may affect organisational ability to implement certain aspects of their recommendations for improvement as part of the accreditation.

We were the highest scoring bike friendly business in the West Yorkshire region due to things like our campus bike hub, excellent bike parking facilities, cycle to work scheme, staff access to hire bikes and dedicated contacts for cycling in Sustainability Service.  We were only 8 marks from being the first gold accredited regional business so we are now going to look at the areas which were highlighted for improvement such as availability of cycle training and more lockable bike parking to aim for Gold next year!

As part of this accreditation the University are now able to apply for a small grant, offered to help us create a further improved environment to encourage staff and visitors to cycle to campus. We are exploring the possibility of applying for more electric bikes for hire from the bike hub as part of this available grant funding. Watch this space!

If you are interested in finding out more about the scheme, please click here. http://cyclecityconnect.co.uk/get-involved/working-with-businesses/

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust volunteer day

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust Volunteer day:

It was a beautiful sunny day on the 19th October as we set out to Bingley, a small town just West of Leeds and Bradford. As we arrived at our destination we loaded ourselves with spades, shovels, hammers, gloves, wood panels and piping and set off down to a remote woodland area near the river.

We began by clearing the area of weeds and any debris left from the recent 2015 floods along the River Aire where we found all sorts of bits and bobs: plant pots, signs and large bags of compost. The soil itself was sandy and unconsolidated making it much easier to work with as we then proceeded to dig 2 separate otter holts located 20m apart from one another. The holes themselves measured 2 metres by 1.5 metres which required a lot more manual labour than was initially expected! Branching off from the holes were entrance and exit tunnels that the otters could use to enter but also escape the holt if any predators tried their luck with breaking and entering.

After a long morning of digging and excavating, it was finally time to lay down the wooden panels that would make the skeleton frame of the holt. Arranged in a square, 1.2m x 1.2m space, the holt was beginning to take shape with clear entrance and exits leading to a spacious living area. Although we didn’t actually see any otters in the wild floating down the river holding hands as they sleep like we’d hoped, we did see evidence of otter activity in the area in the form of tiny little footprints scattered across the mud. This was an encouraging sight as it was evidence that otters are active in the area and would make good use of the holts.

The volunteer day was a great experience and opportunity to help out with the work that the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust are doing to increase species inhabitancy in the area. The holts themselves were constructed with the intention of encouraging otters to recolonise and breed along the River Aire.

If you’d like to find out more about the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust and the work they are currently doing visit their website at http://www.ywt.org.uk/.