Sustainability in the Curriculum: LUBS Commercial and Professional Skills Module Update

This year, Masters students taking the Commercial and Professional Skills module at Leeds University Business School were given the opportunity to work with the Sustainability Service as part of a consultancy project!

Posing as internal consultants, student groups were tasked to review the student and staff awareness of sustainability initiatives across the University and develop recommendations that could improve people’s knowledge of the Sustainability Strategy and what they can get involved in.

After initial meetings with members of the Sustainability team, groups went away and collected data using a questionnaire to gain a better understanding of people’s sustainability knowledge and activities that are already taking place. They also reviewed specific areas of engagement by the University, using their results to highlight gaps for improvement and make recommendations.

The student’s proposals ranged from utilising social media trends and behaviours, to increasing visibility on campus, and tailoring campaigns for specific audiences.

This is just one of the ways we are integrating sustainability into student learning as part of our commitment to giving all students the opportunity to study and be involved in sustainability.

Student Consultancy

Living Lab

Download our progress report Leeds Living Lab:_One year on’ to find out more about what we have all achieved in the first year of the programme.

 

Our vision is a University where ideas and collaboration thrive, where integration of sustainability enhances the value of the campus, student education, research and innovation, and where everyone is given the knowledge and skills to be more sustainable.

The Living Lab is open to everyone. It brings together colleagues and partners from research, teaching and operational teams to co-produce innovative and transformational solutions to real-world sustainability challenges, using the campus as a test-bed. It is interdisciplinary and drives continual, sustainable improvement by tackling global challenges at the local scale.

Questions?

We’ve pulled together a list of FAQs here, but if you can’t find what you’re looking for just contact Thom Cooper in the Sustainability Service who’ll be happy to help.

See the other staff opportunities available through the Sustainability Service here.

CGD Summer School: Exploring challenges and opportunities to achieving ‘Just Practices of Development’ in the context of the SDGs

As the international community gears up to respond to the new Sustainable Development Goals, join us to debate issues around development research and practice and whether and how genuine reform, inclusion and justice might be achieved.

In a world characterised by recurrent crises, and entrenched and deepening inequalities, business as usual remains the order of the day in many professional fields, including international development. And yet, the societal upheavals and disappointing outcomes of recent interventions and policies in the name of ‘development’ pose important questions for the current modus operandi of international development actors. Our summer school picks up on this point and problematizes various international development practices, in order to analyse how they are framed, and by whom, and their role in reproducing or challenging the status quo. We reflect on how and why current practices bring such a difficult mix of challenges for human existence and survival ranging from poverty and urban growth, to climate change, food and health, and ask:


•How is development practice entangled in the current challenges of political conflict, social inequality and unsustainability, and what opportunities are there to overcome this?
•What are the principal challenges when implementing more progressive development approaches that advance ‘inclusive’, ‘bottom up’, or popular-democratic development?
•What are the politics of knowledge in development practice? In other words, whose knowledge counts and matters in the day-to-day operations of a range of development stakeholders, considering the constraints posed by narrow measures of effectiveness, managerialism, results-based management and payment-by-results frameworks? How is this being tackled?

This summer school will address these questions as we explore the very real challenges of ‘doing’ development as the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) gain momentum.

Take part in 5 days of lively and stimulating debate, lectures and workshops with University of Leeds academics, special guests and summer school participants from around the world. Refreshments, lunches and afternoon tea, coffee and cakes included – plus the Summer School dinner.

Bursaries

International bursary competition

This is for applicants who live outside of the UK, the bursary will cover the Summer School fee, 5 nights accommodation in Leeds and a contribution towards travel costs.

Fees and accommodation only bursary

This is for all applicants and will cover the Summer School fee and 5 nights accommodation in Leeds

Applicants should send 500 words outlining their interest in Summer School and what they hope to do in the future, other useful information would be the applicants background, any previous experience of work or study in development, what contribution they will make to the Summer School. This bursary application should be emailed along with a CV to Laura Smith at eeles@leeds.ac.uk on or before April 20th 2016.

Please state in your email which bursary you wish to be considered for.

For further information and updates on summer school please see here.

Co-creating frugal innovations for sustainable development in resource-scarce, low-income settings

Can two wicked sustainability problems: extreme poverty and overuse of natural resources be solved simultaneously? At the outset, these objectives appear mutually exclusive as addressing pressing poverty problems such the need for clean water, food, access to energy and decent shelter requires the use of natural resources. The prospect of a solution is further complicated because the likelihood of developed countries sacrificing any of their resource use and consumption for the benefit of poorer parts of the world’s population, seems remote at best.

In the seminar I will discuss frugal innovation as one potential approach to the above. Frugal innovations are resource scarce solutions – anything from products to business models – that are designed under resource constraints, are affordable even for very low-income people, and are good enough to meet the basic needs of individuals and communities which would otherwise remain neglected. Frugal innovations are typically created by local grassroots entrepreneurs or large corporations. I will highlight a third approach – multi-stakeholder co-creation of frugal innovations in resource-scarce settings with low-income communities – and discuss why it makes sense that researchers, students, business firms and NGOs from developed countries participate in such innovation endeavours. I will also highlight sense-making challenges in these multi-stakeholder groups and provide frugal water and energy co-creation examples from our current action research project.