Colour Hyde Park Community Mural Project

VIEW OUR PDF MURAL MAP HERE!

The Project

This webpage documents the creation of the murals developed as part of the 2019 Colour Hyde Park project through collaboration with the people, businesses, universities and schools of Hyde Park. We invite you to use this as a guide to understand more about the murals and to encourage you to take a tour of Hyde Park, the latest destination for community art!

In January 2019 the University of Leeds teamed together with a local artist and the Hyde Park neighbourhood to deliver a community mural project. Murals and street art are a wonderful way to preserve our city’s cultural identity and inspire communities to feel pride and ownership for the place they live. We developed this project with local people; providing workshops and activities prior to the murals being painted to ensure the community was involved from the start and that the designs truly resonate with the residents of Hyde Park.

Our project team feels passionately about Hyde Park and creating art that is accessible and representative of the neighbourhood that it visually represents. In June 2019 we came together to through workshops, events and painting, to create our murals. The artists for this project were chosen by our community panel, each artist with their own connection to Hyde Park. The designs created reflect the spirit of Hyde Park through recreating local landmarks and architecture alongside shapes and images that symbolise the area and the people that live in it.

This project would not have been possible without the positivity and support throughout from local residents, the Hyde Park Neighbourhood Forum, Brudenell Primary School, local councillors and local businesses. 

The Murals

In February we ran an open design competition for four of the murals. We requested the designs reflect the natural beauty of the area and celebrate the diversity of the community. Our community panel, built from members representing the full community, helped us choose our four winners; Charlotte, Niall, Joy and Maya. The final two artists, Emma and Fem, are developing their designs through workshops with Brudenell Primary School. 

Workshops

Two of our artists, Emma and Fem, developed their mural designs through workshops at Brudenell Primary School to collect stories and experiences of the area from the children. They used the workshops as a way to understand and visualise Hyde Park as the children see it.

The children provided artwork inspired by the places they visit, such as the Makkah Mosque and Abu Bakr supermarket. Another popular shape was ice cream, often eaten by the kids out on Woodhouse Moor. The shapes and styles created by the children will be incorporated into Emma and Fem’s murals.

Mural Map
To create a lasting legacy for the community, artists and everyone involved, we have created a Mural Map. This will feature all six murals, alongside biographies from our incredible artists. 

Please click here to view a PDF of the map.

THANK YOU.

We would like to thank all those involved on this project, especially the Hyde Park Neighbourhood Forum and the local businesses.

Special thanks to:

  • Councillor Al Garthwaite for all of her enthusiasm and support throughout this project.
  • the community judging panel who worked together to select the competition winners;
  • Brudenell Primary School teachers and children who assisted and attended the workshops;
  • the landlords who kindly donated their walls for the artists to paint;
  • the student volunteers who assisted with consulting the residents;
  • and finally, all the artists who have done an incredible job of creating bespoke pieces for the area.

This project was funded by the University of Leeds, Leeds Inspired, the Inner North West Community Committee and supported by Leeds Beckett University.

For further information please contact Project Leader, Rosanna Flett, or Creative Consultant, Emma Hardaker (@evhardaker).

Moving Out Checklist

End of year can be a hectic time for students. Exam season has ended and already you need to pack up your things and move on to a new house or depart Leeds for good. Before your thoughts turn to taking time off, having a holiday and seeing family, take a little time to prepare for your move and save yourself some money and hassle in the process!

To help take the stress and hassle out of moving out we’ve created a handy moving out checklist. It includes tips on where to find your nearest glass recycling, where you can donate your unwanted stuff and last minute things to consider before you hand back your keys.

1. Leave Leeds Tidy 

Consider donating your unwanted stuff instead of throwing it away. Drop off any unwanted at one of the end of year collections running in residencies, the local community and campus.  You can drop off any furniture, clothes, kitchen goods, electricals, non-perishable food and anything else that you no longer need! Follow us on Facebook or Twitter for updates on collections near you (#ASmoothMove) or check the Moving Out map http://bit.ly/MovingOutMap

2. Dispose of your rubbish properly!

Did you know that every year, over 70 truckloads of waste is produced on changeover day alone?! And a lot of this can end up littering the streets and gardens which also means your landlord can charge you for extra cleaning. Take care of the environment (and your wallet) and make sure your housemates stagger your rubbish disposal times so bins don’t overflow. Use the Leeds Bin App here to find out what should be put in each bin!

3. Recycle your empties

Been hoarding glass in your garden with the intention of recycling it?   Put those good intentions in to practice and take your glass to your nearest bottle bank. (No you can’t put them in your green bin!) Download the Leeds Bins app to find your nearest. https://datamillnorth.org/products/leeds-bins/

4. Leave only empty cupboards behind

Check if you need to buy any more food.  Use up what you have stored away in the cupboards and freezer before buying any more. If you have any food leftover at the end of year, call around to your neighbours and see if they would like it or drop off any none perishable food at one of the city’s collection points. See the Moving Out map for details of where you can find your nearest. http://bit.ly/MovingOutMap

5. Who does all this stuff belong to?

Starting to regret not having done any cleaning this year? To have any chance of getting your deposit back it’s time for everyone to muck in and get things sorted.  Work out a plan with your housemates how you will divide up the tasks, sort out who owns what and clean communal areas.  That includes your garden and outside spaces!  It’s a good idea to agree a day that you can all get together and clean up before everyone starts disappearing.

6. Make some extra cash for the summer

Sell your unwanted textbooks, clothes, electricals and media and get some extra cash for the summer. See our Living in Leeds Guide for more information. http://sustainability.leeds.ac.uk/being-a-positive-partner-in-society/your-community/

7. Take meter readings

A few weeks before you move out, contact the utility companies and let them know that you will be closing the account soon. On your final day take your meter readings, inform the companies to close your account and give them a forwarding address to send the bill. Do keep a record of the meter readings. Once paid, make sure you send proof to the landlord/agent. 

8. Protect your ID

Shred any documentation with your personal details on it. Identity thieves are known to go looking through bins as well as looking for any opportunistic open doors and windows to help themselves to your laptop.  It’s also not a good idea to store all of your possessions in a car overnight as it will get broken in to!

9. Get out and see Leeds 

It’s not too late to take advantage of your free time in Leeds to go to one of city’s many great summer festivals and attractions. Looking for ideas on what you can do? Check out the following link which lists what’s going on! https://confidentials.com/leeds/things-to-do

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sustainability Awards 2019

This year, the annual Sustainability Awards will be on Wednesday 12th June.  As well as celebrating the outstanding work being done by people across the University to make the campus more sustainable, we will also be looking back.  2019 is the 10-year anniversary of the Bike Hub, who keep the staff and students of Leeds travelling sustainably by offering bike hire, repairs and training (and plenty of biscuits!).  It has also been 10 years since we started employing student interns in the Sustainability Service, bringing fresh ideas and student opinions to the team.

The Vice Chancellor will be presenting awards for the four sustainability strategy themes – Embedding Sustainability through Collaboration, Building Knowledge and Capacity, Being a Positive Partner in Society and Making the Most of Resources.  There will also be a Sustainable Purchasing Award, and two student awards for curricular and non-curricular work.  The nominations for the awards are now closed.

After this, there will then be an entirely vegan, locally sourced (where possible) two course dinner .  Vegan wine and soft drink options will accompany what is always known to be a delicious meal, changing the perspectives of a vegan menu.

Finally, we will then be celebrating the first year of our new engagement programme, Blueprint. Launched in October 2018, this replaced the Green Impact programme, creating a bespoke sustainability action plan for individual Schools and Services.  This programme is proving to be very popular, having already reached a wider audience than we achieved with the Green Impact programme!

As always, the striking table decorations will be designed and supplied by the staff and children of Bright Beginnings Childcare Centre.

Nominations for the awards are now closed.

Don’t turn into a Grinch this holiday break: follow our simple steps to make the holiday break so much better.

1. Too many tins of soup left? – Donate!

Give it away instead of it wasting away

Clear out your fridge and donate any leftover food. Why not give it to housemates or friends that are staying in Leeds over the break? Or simply drop it off at the FD Building on campus and  any of the university residences’ reception (non- perishable foods only) where it will be given to help others this Christmas.

2. Room a mess? – Take your stuff home.

A quick way to declutter

If you have too many things lying around that you didn’t use or need this semester, take it home with you or donate it to a British Heart Foundation donation bank (on campus and in halls) to help you declutter. Remember you’ll be getting new things so make space for them!
Give yourself the perfect Christmas gift – a nice clean room!

4. Shut down what you don’t need and save money.

Switch it off!

No one wants to come home to crazy electricity bills after the break. Shut down what you don’t need but keep a few lights on for security purposes. Treat yourself to a light timer plug!  Not everyone has control of their heating, but keep it low if you can!

 

5. Take your valuables home/ keep them out of sight.

Keep it out of sight. You don’t know who is watching.

Keep your belongings safe. Take your valuables home and keep anything you’ve left behind out of sight!

6. Staying in Leeds? Join in the festivities.

Take a break from revision (or procrastination)

It’s freezing out there, but don’t stay cooped up inside all day. Take a break from your busy schedule of procrastination – I mean doing your assignments… Join in the festivities and check out the annual #UniLeedsChristmas events!

 

Are you staying in Leeds over the winter break? Christmas in Leeds is an annual programme for all students and…

Posted by University of Leeds on Monday, November 26, 2018

7. Most importantly have a great Christmas break and see you in the New Year.

Happy Holidays!!!!

Single Out #2023PlasticFree

In 2018 The University of Leeds and Leeds University Union together pledged to become single-use plastic-free by 2023.

This commitment to phase out single-use plastic across the board, not just in catering and office spaces is a very complex challenge. It involves mapping plastic use across the University and Union and then identifying action plans to end its use through finding alternatives and changing ways of working. It will also require working with external partners and supply chains to phase out the amount of plastic products and packaging coming onto campus.

The pledge commits catering and office spaces to becoming single-use plastic-free by 2020, with the longer-term goal of lab space and other services by 2023. This is a very ambitious target and will involve collaboration, research and operational changes to be successful.

Take a look at our strategy for how we plan to achieve this.

How can I help?

Progress so far

1 million pieces already removed

One million pieces of single-use plastic have been removed from use across the University and Union during the first year of the pledge.

This is a fantastic achievement – colleagues across the University have really taken the plastic-free pledge on and accomplished some brilliant things and we can already celebrate some notable successes.

Successes so far

  • Devonshire Hall

    Devonshire Hall catering team has replaced sauce and spread sachets with self-serve bowls at mealtimes, cutting out more than 86,000 items per year

  • School of Earth and Environment

    Cohen Laboratory in the School of Earth and Environment changed its way of working to stop using single-use centrifuge racks, saving thousands of these items per year

  • Great Food at Leeds

    Affine café in Nexus was developed with the Plastic Free Pledge in mind, removing single-use plastics from its fresh food preparation and presentation, only providing hot drinks in mugs and reusable cups and selling soft drinks in glass bottles or cans

What’s planned for 2020?

Our main priorities for the next year include:

  • focusing on catering and offices to make them single-use plastic-free by the end of the year
  • engaging with retail partners and suppliers to find innovative solutions to remove single-use plastic from their packaging
  • working with procurement to understand our plastic footprint further, across all areas of the University; and
  • promoting best practice and sharing knowledge to encourage further activity, both within the University and across the Leeds city region and the HE sector as a whole

How can you help?

We need everyone’s support to achieve the 2023 target, and there are loads of ways you can get involved:

  • review your work or study area to understand where single-use plastics are being used, and contribute to our mapping exercise (fill out the form below to receive our template document available for you to use)
  • make a positive change; if you know of a solution to reduce or eradicate single-use plastic where you work or study, then please do it if you need ideas or help then get in touch
  • become a Staff Sustainability Architect to help deliver plastic-focused sustainability projects specific to your area of work
  • Work with us to develop a Blueprint plan for your school or service. This process will identify sustainability impacts and opportunities for your team in order to develop an action plan bespoke to your area of work
  • Undertake research focused on single-use plastic solutions and innovation through your degree course, or our Living Lab programme

 

To get more information on these and receive a copy of the review template document complete the form below;

Fields marked with an * are required

We care about your privacy. The Sustainability team will only contact you regarding our #2023plasticfree in line with our privacy policy. If you'd like to hear more about the work that we do you can sign up to our monthly email newsletter.

Our strategy

To achieve our ambition of a single-use plastic-free University we will work closely with stakeholders including staff, students and suppliers, to identify plastics and develop action plans to remove them or replace them with sustainable alternatives.

The delivery strategy involves three key elements; operational changes, research and collaboration, which are all underpinned by communication, engagement and governance. Details of these areas have been outlined below:

  1. Operational changes
    These are the operational changes required across the University to manage and reduce single use plastic. This will involve mapping single use plastic, building the knowledge and capacity of staff, and changing policies, guidelines and processes of operational procedures in support of the pledge.
  1. Research
    We will actively encourage and support research around single use plastic, including alternatives, infrastructure developments and behaviour change. This will be encouraged through academics projects, student curriculum projects and our Living Lab programme.
  1. Collaboration
    We will build networks of activity internally between our staff and students and externally with our stakeholders, supply chain and sector partners in order to share learning overcome the challenges together.

Contact us

Get in touch with us and show us what you’re doing through our social media using #2023plasticfree and tagging us on Twitter @UoL_Sus, Instagram @uol_sus  and Facebook @UolSustainability or email ideas to plasticfree@leeds.ac.uk

To understand our definition of single-use plastic, why we made the pledge and details behind the timeframe, view our current FAQ page here.

Go Higher West Yorkshire – St Agnes Parents Group

Sometimes it is as simple as a conversation, with the right person, that sparks an idea and starts to build a strong relationship. In June 2017 the Outreach Officer for Leeds College of Building and the Area Manager for Leeds Go Higher West Yorkshire met with the Reverend of St Agnes church, Burmantofts, Leeds.

Since that date, and with the additional support of the Go Higher West Yorkshire (GHWY) officers from Leeds City College, Kirklees College and the University of Leeds, a parents group has formed. Workshops are delivered to around 30 parents and carers each time (and sometimes young people too)! The workshops are tailored to the groups’ needs and vary in topics including apprenticeships, futures in health, what are the different routes and options in Higher Education. All workshops involve the opportunity to meet current students, and students that reflect the young people from Burmantofts.

Go Higher West Yorkshire are led by the University of Leeds and host to the GHWY central team. GHWY are formally recognised by Office for Students as the Single Point of Contact (SPOC) for all 11-18 schools in West Yorkshire, as well as primary schools and businesses.

Find out more about projects that the University of Leeds is involved in by signing up to our bi-monthly community newsletter at sustainability.leeds.ac.uk/sign-up-to-our-e-newsletter  

Community E-Newsletter

Produced by the Sustainability Service with contributions from across the University, our bi-monthly community newsletter brings you a wide range of articles on community-related projects.  From research co-designed by and benefiting local communities, to projects raising the aspirations of local young people. Projects showing student contributions to communities as well as those encouraging them to be good citizens, plus public events, lectures and activities welcoming visitors to campus. Our aim is to keep you up to date with what is happening on campus, as well as highlighting the ways you can get involved.

  • The latest edition of the Community newsletter can be found here. 
  • To see previous newsletters take a look at our archive.

To be added to the community newsletter circulation complete our online form here or contact Amanda Jackson.

My End of Year Retrospective of Hyde Park

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Sue Buckle, long term resident of Hyde Park shares her thoughts about the end of term, students departure and how students are viewed by permanent residents.

It’s that time of year again- gardens are lovely with spring blossom and on pavements, black bags overflowing with clothes charity shops would be glad of. The universities terms are nearly over and soon our student neighbours will be on the move.

It’s sad to say goodbye to the students who’ve become friends, even though we’ve never had the promised coffee or drink together due to busy lives.  My immediate neighbours have been great, considerate and friendly, and I wish they were staying another year. The ones on the street who’ve woken people up after midnight with loud, shrieking discussions about who’s going in which taxi or who’ve resolutely refused/forgotten to put their bins back in gardens- we can live without!

So far, Bank Holiday Monday, it’s been pretty quiet with only a few occasional loud boozey voices late at nights. We empathise with the euphoria of ending exams, but if only the lucky ones would remember the poor souls still revising for their exams. Local school children are still revising for their GCSE and A-level exams. Friends from a neighbouring street report “bearable noise” so far, but are bracing themselves for the next few weeks. Even the benefits of Hyde Park Christmas- the piles of discarded clothes, furniture, household items and food- don’t make up for the misery of sleep deprivation. Especially when you have an early start the next day or been told “This is a student area. Why don’t you move?”

Going back to bins- yesterday, walking up Victoria Road with my two adult daughters visiting their old home for the weekend, we had to step around the mess from bins overturned by we assume bladdered idiots on their way home. Festering rubbish including so much discarded food all over the pavement! This morning, three Council staff were picking up and bagging every smelly item- at a cost to the cash strapped Council! In a queue at the Cardigan Road Co-Op recently a friend overheard two students discussion on what a trash heap Hyde Park was. O the irony….

BUT, coming up my street today I chatted to some students who are staying next year, all done with exams apart from one. They’re keeping our recent street-flyer and will be following our tips to pass on their edible food to our Real Junk Food Project down at All Hallows Church, plus any other unwanted stuff which is reusable or recyclable.

When its near to the end of June, my washing machine will be on most days with binned clothes to pass on to charity shops and the South Headingley Community Association table top stall at Kirkstall Festival and Unity Day will benefit from all the stuff that students or their parents cars can’t fit in. Hopefully these will come straight to me, rather than via the bins!

Then it’s a peaceful summer with those of us whose home is here getting the chance to know better the students here over the summer- before October, and another 200+ new neighbours to try to get to know and welcome to the Hyde Park community!

The Hidden Cost of a Party

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Creating noise nuisance can not only lead to hefty Council fines and a disciplinary from your institution but it could also be costly in repairing any damage to the property you rent if you hold parties. With the use of social media it’s now easier than ever to spread the word about a party you’re hosting and you risk dozens of strangers turning up and attracting the wrong crowd who won’t respect you, your property or your belongings. Once a large crowd gathers it is very difficult to disperse everyone and as a tenant you will remain liable for any damage caused by the guests- even if you did not know them.  Remember, you are not only paying for the repair itself but also the contractors time which can be very expensive- some examples of costs to expect would be;

Filling and painting over one damaged wall; £60 plus

New carpets; £500 plus

Professional clean; £50 plus

Replacing a broken sofa; £450 plus

If you are not towards the end of your tenancy your landlord can demand you pay for these costs straight away and if it is towards the end of your tenancy you risk losing your deposit altogether and being taken to court for any remaining charges.

It is very common for landlords to request references before allowing you to sign a new contract- remember to bare this in mind because even after you have paid for the damaged property your landlord would still have to be honest when asked if they would consider you a trustworthy tenant.  Some landlords require references from the previous five years so this could have a major impact on you for a long time to come.

Studying is very hard work and it is expected you balance this with a good social life but if you have friends around remember to limit the number you invite and only invite people you trust.  Speak to your neighbours and let them know to contact you if they are disturbed by noise from your property. Leeds offers a wide range of bars, pubs and clubs and it is a much better idea to go to these for a party rather than risking the consequences noise nuisance can bring.

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Myth Busting the House Party

My top tip to any student thinking of holding a house party is to think carefully whether you are likely to cause any offence or nuisance to those living around you- remember loud music can travel some distance and will affect more than your immediate neighbours.   

I’ve heard many DIY solutions that students have tried in the past to try and prevent the noise from the DJ’s and professional sound systems being heard. No amount of cardboard or mattresses pressed against windows will prevent your neighbours from hearing exactly what is going on! Especially if your guest list extends to 100+ people who will be in and out of your property and causing a disturbance as they make their way home through the neighbourhood in the early hours. And of course, I wouldn’t have this knowledge if it wasn’t for the University receiving numerous complaints about noise and having to speak to the students involved.

Here are a few more common misconceptions about house parties that I have come across.

1. The noise has to exceed a certain decibel level for action to be taken. NOT TRUE! A sound meter isn’t even used. The University and Leeds Antisocial Behaviour Team make an assessment based on who your neighbours are and how noise is impacts on the wellbeing of your neighbours.

2. Action can only be taken over noise that happens at night.  NOT TRUE! Noise is more of a problem for people after 11pm but action can be taken for noise at any time. Even at low levels if you have a neighbour that is more sensitive to noise, such as an elderly neighbour.

3. If I can hear the noise, investigators can take action. TRUE! If the noise is audible outside of your house, there is a good chance it’s loud enough to cause a problem for your neighbours.  Turn the volume down!

4. Having Bouncers will limit the number of people crashing your party and prevent problems with your neighbours. NOT TRUE! Bouncers are more likely to scare off your neighbours when they call around to let you know there is a problem.  Being able to speak to your neighbours direct about any issues as they arise is a far better way of dealing and resolving disputes. Disciplinary and enforcement action is a far worse consequence of making a mistake than having to apologise to the people living next door.

5. If you create excessive noise you are breaking the law. TRUE! Leeds Antisocial Behaviour Team can take enforcement action that includes the confiscation of equipment, house closure notices, fines and a criminal conviction.

6. If I let my neighbours know that I’m having a party then no action can be taken. NOT TRUE! I would always advise that you speak with your neighbours in advance of having your friends over and share your contact details. However, residential streets are no place for a party that continues past midnight and has over 30 guests at any time!  Your neighbours are still likely to make a complaint if your event is too big, too loud and goes on too late.

7. Its my birthday, a one off party isn’t going to hurt anyone. NOT TRUE! If every student has a house party for their birthday then that means  a lot of parties and a lot of lost sleep! Take your celebrations in to town or book a venue to hold your party.

8. Hyde Park is a student area, its okay to have house parties. NOT TRUE! Hyde Park is home to many different residents. No street is completely student only. We also receive as many complaint from students as other residents about house parties!

9. I moved into a property next to a noisy neighbour so I guess I have to put up with it. NOT TRUE! Let us know if you are experiencing a problem through our Helpline. You may not be the only person affected by the noise!

10. I can’t have my friends over at any time as my neighbours will complaint. NOT TRUE! No one is likely to object to your having your friends over if you do so in a reasonable way. Would you really like to live next door to a party animal if you had to be up for work or lectures at 9am?

For information on the University’s procedures in handling off-campus issues see my earlier Blog for details on the joint action being taken by the Council and Police to tackle noisy parties.