Leeds sustainable curriculum

At the University of Leeds our award-winning curriculum reflects our wider approach to sustainability. Our vision for student education is to provide a transformative, research-based educational experience for students from diverse backgrounds, who develop the knowledge and skills they need to succeed and make a positive impact in the world.

Through this vision we are committed to:

  • Becoming a world-leading institution for sustainability and climate change learning and teaching, reflecting and supported by our world-leading research portfolio;
  • Providing our students with the knowledge, skills and attributes to contribute solutions to global challenges in an equitable and just way, and;
  • Further extending the inclusion of sustainability in our educational engagement and outreach activities

Sustainability has been embedded into the Leeds Curriculum for many years. Our Leeds Sustainable Curriculum Framework is unique and has been developed by the University of Leeds to provide a holistic approach to embedding sustainability across every discipline and provide opportunities for all students to learn about sustainability and get involved. Our approach to “broadening” won a UK Green Gown Award in 2015, our holistic and integrated approach across curricular and co-curricular activity received the International Sustainable Campus Network (ISCN) Whole Systems Approach Award in 2020, and our Living Lab approach won the ISCN Partnership Award in 2021.

Sustainability through your degree

There are many ways that every student at Leeds can develop knowledge and skills in sustainability as part of your degree, whatever the discipline. Through the Creating Sustainable Futures Discovery theme you can access hundreds of sustainability related modules, you can participate in the Leeds Living Lab, or you could do your dissertation or assessed project on sustainability. Follow the links below to access further information and support.

Discovery modules

The Creating Sustainable Futures Discovery Theme provides a wide variety of sustainability modules to broaden knowledge and enhance employability.

Sign up for a Discovery Module.

Embedding through coursework

A great example of this is happening at the Leeds University Business School, where students have been able to integrate sustainability into the Commercial & Professional Skills Module.

Dissertations and research projects

The Sustainability Service has a list of potential research projects and case studies and can support students in developing research through the Leeds Living Lab. You could showcase your work through the annual Student Sustainability Research Conference and get published in the student-led research journal, Discovering Sustainability.

Get in touch to find out more about research projects: sustainability@leeds.ac.uk.

Degree programmes

A huge variety of degree programmes develop knowledge, skills and experience of sustainability.

Use the University of Leeds Course Finder to help find what you are looking for.

Embedding sustainability into teaching

The Sustainability Service can support any member of staff who wants to integrate sustainability into their programmes and modules.

Mapping the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs)

We have developed a process to map programmes and modules against the UN SDGs. This will help you to understand where you are already touching on sustainability, and where you could do more. The tool is available to all staff seeking to better understand their module or programme’s relationship with sustainability. Leeds University Business School are currently mapping their full curriculum against the SDGs and are sharing their learning through the Sustainable Curriculum Working Group.

Tools and resources to integrate sustainability

The Leeds Sustainable Curriculum Working Group coordinates a suite of tools and guidance documents to support teaching staff in embedding sustainability into their programmes and modules.

UN SDG Academy

Free educational resources from some of the world’s leading experts on sustainable development. The SDG Academy creates and curates free massive open online courses and educational materials on sustainable development and the Sustainable Development Goals.
https://sdgacademy.org/

QAA and Advance HE Education for Sustainable Development Guidance

In March 2021, QAA and Advance HE launched revised guidance intended to help UK higher education institutions incorporate ESD within their curricula, following on from the first edition in 2014. The updated guidance document can be downloaded at  https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/education-for-sustainable-development#

EAUC Sustainability in Higher Education Developers (SHED) Group

SHED is the leading cross-sector Community of Practice in the UK for Education for Sustainability (EfS). The University of Leeds are members of the EAUC.
https://www.eauc.org.uk/shed

EAUC ESD Resources

Following the launch of the new guidance on Education for Sustainable Development in higher education, jointly published by QAA and Advance HE,  EAUC present a selection of resources and event opportunities that will provide further support to help you to incorporate Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) within the curricula: https://www.sustainabilityexchange.ac.uk/esd_new_eauc_resources

University of Leeds FutureLearn courses

The diverse range of FutureLearn courses developed by the University of Leeds will allow the exploration of new and different ways to provide online education. In particular, see the following courses:
• Environmental Challenges
• Ecology and Wildlife Conservation
• Food Science and Nutrition: From the Farm to You
• Discovering Science
• Causes of Human Disease
• Innovation: the World’s Greatest
• Transport Systems: Global Issues and Future Innovations
More courses can be found at: https://www.futurelearn.com/partners/university-of-leeds

SDGOnline

A curated library from Taylor and Francis to support the UN SDGs.
https://www.taylorfrancis.com/sdgo/

Ellen MacArthur Foundation Circular Economy Higher Education Resources

Resources designed by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation for academics and students to build knowledge and stimulate dialogue around the circular economy. Videos, publications, podcasts, workshop activities and guides are available.
https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/learn/higher-education-resources

World’s Largest Lesson

Creative tools for educators and action-focused learning experiences for young people that build skills and motivation to take action for the SDGs. Each year the organisers create campaigns and challenges to keep student learning engaging and relevant. We support these with local activations to make sure no one is left behind.
https://worldslargestlesson.globalgoals.org/

From Art to Zoo Management: embedding sustainability in UK higher and further education

The National Union of Students created the guide “From Art to Zoo Management: embedding sustainability in UK higher and further education” to highlight the meaningful examples of different academic disciplines including sustainability in their curriculum.
https://sustainability.nus.org.uk/resources/from-art-to-zoo-management-embedding-sustainability-in-uk-higher-and-further-education

UN SDG Learn

UN SDG:Learn is a United Nations initiative that aims to bring relevant and curated learning solutions on sustainable development topics to individuals and organizations. Self-paced e-learning courses, interactive presentations and webinars.
https://www.unsdglearn.org/courses/

FAO e-learning Academy

The FAO e-learning Academy offers free access to content on a variety of topics of global interest, available in a range of formats, including e-learning courses for self-paced learning, blended learning programmes, massive open online courses (MOOCs), technical webinars, online tutored courses and mobile learning. Courses are closely aligned with the Sustainable Development Goals and FAO strategic programmes and are peer-reviewed, by a wide range of experts, to ensure content accuracy, quality and coherence.
https://elearning.fao.org/

SDG Helpdesk Knowledge Hub

E-learning courses, videos and publications on the SDGs with a focus on the global South.
http://sdghelpdesk.unescap.org/e-learning

UN CC:Learn

Publications and good learning practices on climate change: https://www.uncclearn.org/resources/
A curated list of e-learning and knowledge sharing platforms: https://www.uncclearn.org/resources/learning-platforms/

UVED (Virtual University for the Environment and Sustainable Development) Resources

The Virtual University for the Environment and Sustainable Development (UVED), one of the eight French Thematic Digital Universities, promotes free access to knowledge, education, the dissemination of knowledge and the training of all stakeholders in the field of the environment and sustainable development. [Website and resources are in French].
https://www.uved.fr/

AdvanceHE Sustainable Development Toolkit: Tutor Resource and Student Activity Series
This toolkit includes a series of lesson plans to help you introduce sustainability into any programme including outlining the intended learning outcomes of each session.
https://www.advance-he.ac.uk/knowledge-hub/sustainable-development-toolkit-tutor-resource-and-student-activity-series

Sustainable Development Solutions Network – Accelerating Education for the SDGs in Universities: A guide for universities, colleges, and tertiary and higher education institutions

Accelerating Education for the SDGs in Universities is a new guide from the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) that aims to help universities, colleges, and tertiary and higher education institutions implement and mainstream “Education for the SDGs” within their institutions. The guide is accompanied by a website, blogs.upm.es/education4sdg, with almost 50 examples of how universities around the world are already accelerating their implementation of Education for the SDGs. View the guide at https://resources.unsdsn.org/accelerating-education-for-the-sdgs-in-universities-a-guide-for-universities-colleges-and-tertiary-and-higher-education-institutions?mc_cid=57cd628037&mc_eid=c9c210475b

The Institute of Engineering and Technology: 150 Show – Green Edition

If there is something missing, or you have ideas to add, please contact us at sustainability@leeds.ac.uk.

Subject-Specific Resources

Sustainability can be integrated into degree programmes in many ways and, depending on the discipline, some areas or approaches may be more relevant than others. The below resources have been developed to provide guidance on how sustainability can relate to your discipline. If there is a gap just let us know - we can help to fill it.

How does sustainability relate to Theatre and Performance?

Cultural sustainability recognises the ties between human/social environments with the physical/natural world. It is the newest pillar in the sustainability agenda that binds the social, environmental and economic strands together, embodying key cultural issues such as diversity, identity, heritage, creativity and freedom of expression. Cultural sustainability appreciates differences in behaviour and how culture influences people’s beliefs, attitudes and valuation of the natural/built environment. It’s an incredibly embracing concept, which affects the way societies operate and the way politics govern different states and communities. Opera North exemplify a cultural sustainability organisation that acts as an example in the industry for all other theatre production groups that aim at reducing their environmental impact and engage employees to behave pro-environmentally. Theatre and Performance graduates will possess the creativity and cultural acceptance to initiate environmentally-focused productions that tackle key local and global cultural sustainability issues.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Theatre and Performance curriculum include:

Operations and Production: Sustainable production models, sustainability themes in production (e.g. narratives of plastics or climate change), utility usage and environmental performance of buildings, ethical or local procurement, sustainable architecture

Community Development: Equal opportunities, engaging disadvantaged communities, collaborating with the international community, multiculturalism, quality education

Eco-Tourism: Local culture and traditions, indigenous communities, conservation and degradation, socio-economic impacts and benefits, biodiversity and natural habitats

Gender Equality: Equal opportunities for employment and leadership, engaging local communities, capacity building, human rights and modern slavery, traditions and religions

Green Festivals: Single-use plastics, throw-away culture, hedonistic lifestyles, corporate social responsibility, marketing and advertising, environmental charities, procurement, water usage, volunteering opportunities, transportation and air pollution

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, environmental citizenship, critical thinking, social justice, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions, normative competency, problem-solving

How does sustainability relate to Fine Art?

Ideas such as sustainability, resilience, and climate change are not easily translated from science to policy since language has a cultural dimension . Such cultural aspects underscore the need for an arts and humanities perspective to explore and communicate sustainability in a visual way to aid understanding. Engagement with other disciplines may lead to innovation within science, as it is argued that engagement with a type of creativity that is central to the arts may catalyze scientific insights .

Nevertheless, using art instrumentally to communicate science should, consequently, be approached with caution as visual arts do not always produce the prettiest pictures. For example, in the materials and paints used there are lashings of toxic pigments, solvents, petrochemicals and other ecologically destructive preservatives . There are sustainable options, thus future artists with a holistic impression of sustainability will understand the necessity of using ethical materials and will have the vision to produce culturally stimulating pieces that demonstrate the struggles of sustainability.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Fine Art curriculum include:

• Culture: Museums and theatres, freedom of expression, identity, values and beliefs, climate and social justice, productions and stories, film and cinema

• Hazardous Materials: Petrochemicals, toxic pigments, preservatives, EU legislation, pollution and contamination, natural materials (water, bees wax, organic linseed), ecological papers, biodegradable, aerosols, pigments with lead, ventilated studios and air quality

• Waste and Energy: Single-use plastics, recycling materials (paper, glass, metal cans), waste disposal, energy consumption (light bulbs), product labelling

• Education: Knowledge sharing, collaboration, innovation, sustainable art classes, school curriculum, museums and theatres, college and university courses

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, creativity, teamwork, critical thinking, environmental citizenship, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions

How does sustainability relate to History?

At its broadest, Environmental History is the study of human interaction with the natural world. Many contemporary environmental historians have been influenced by the approaches of other disciplines such as ecology, anthropology and demography, but historical studies of sustainability stem as far back as the 18th century. While Malthus(1798) predicted human population growth would exponentially exceed food production, in the mid-20th century, environmentalism was starting to be widely documented. From Silent Spring(1965) to Limits to Growth(1972), the links between anthropogenic impact and environmental degradation were being realised and led to the first cases of environmental activism.

Since the rise of globalisation, intergovernmental panels have attempted to curtail large-scale sustainability issues that has give rise to the history of climate action activism. From the Rio Earth Summit (1992) to Copenhagen(2009) and the Paris Agreement(2015), various initiatives have attempted to mitigate the realities of climate change, but the problems continue to persist. The global youth strike movement highlights the widespread civil society response to climate change and other sustainability issues, thus producing a new wave of environmentalism history. Graduates with a core and holistic understanding of sustainability will have the skillset to develop innovative solutions, but will also be aware of the environmental movement and appreciate its roots.

Sustainability topics relevant to the History curriculum include:

• Policy and Governance: Conference of Party summits, UNFCCC, Kyoto Protocol (1996), Climate Change Act (2008), Paris Agreement (2015), carbon trading schemes, taxes and subsidies, lobbying

• Climate Action: Climategate and Copenhagen, Al Gore and Inconvenient Truth, social media activism, youth strike movement, Extinction Rebellion, mass media framing, collective action, environmentalism, oil crisis, civil societies

• Demographics: Population growth, gender equality, globalisation, urbanisation, infant mortality, economic development, Global North and South, public health, employment and education, One Child Policy, natural increase/decrease

• Culture and Anthropology: Traditions, values attitudes and beliefs, indigenous communities, festivals, religions, multiculturalism, diversity

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future and systems thinking, teamwork, critical thinking, environmental citizenship, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach

How does sustainability relate to Journalism, Media and Communications?

From Blue Planet 2 to Leonardo DiCaprio, critical mass awareness of sustainability has been supported by the use of digital media. Climate change had historically been reported in the press but was affected by the partisan divide of mass media politics, which framed the issue as a hoax or a concerning issue . Key moments of media influencing public opinion in favour of environmentalism include Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth, but due to scientific uncertainty key messages were not always well received. However, social media has helped stimulate discussion about sustainability, facilitating the collaboration new actors that can communicate on a space that never used to exist .

Nevertheless, criticisms of social have included notions of ‘clicktivism’ coinciding with the growth of fake news and inaccurate reporting of particular issues. Although, the rise of Greta Thunberg and the youth strikes were largely down to the growth of social media activism and online collective action. Digital media is so important in spreading awareness and engaging different stakeholders. Therefore, media graduates with a holistic understanding of sustainability will appreciate the importance of communicating key messages to a large and diverse audience.

Sustainability topics relevant to the media and communications curriculum include:

• Climate Action: Climategate and Copenhagen, youth strikes, Extinction Rebellion, climate justice, fossil fuels, collective action, civil societies, left-wing politics

• Environmental News: Scientific uncertainty, framing, political bias, fake news and Donald Trump, Brexit, celebrity endorsement, environmental charities, transparency

• Social Media: Reducing paper consumption, communicating to masses, sustainability campaigns, videos, sharing information and best practice, events, echo chamber, clickitivism, advertising, online communities, instant messaging

• Environmental Performance: Recycled materials, single-use plastic, renewable energy, energy consumption, lighting and heating of studios, data storage

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, systems thinking, critical thinking, environmental citizenship, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions, technological design

How does sustainability relate to Biology?

Biologists find ways to protect the environment and help humans live sustainably, and in ecology, a sustainable system is one in which biodiversity and productivity are preserved over time . However, due to human impact we often have to restore habitats so that animals and plants can return to the land we use. Long-lived and healthy wetlands and forests are examples of sustainable biological systems, which have been conserved following degradation. However, biologists implement sustainability within the built environment too, as most industries affect habitats in urban settings. For example, biologists working within industry might be involved in the planning of a new road to make sure important wildlife areas are not disturbed . To implement the right policy measures for creating a sustainable society, a much better understanding of the biological processes involved is essential. Therefore, biologists with a core understanding of sustainability will firstly know the theory behind sustainability, but also be able to act as mediators between sustainable change agents that can enact organisational and political change.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Biology curriculum include:

• Ecosystems and Biodiversity: Climate change, habitat loss, ecology and conservation, species extinction, animal welfare, environmental charities

• Water and Food: Water sanitation, wetlands, security, harvesting rainwater, dam construction, farming and agriculture, water intensity of products, poverty and inequality, standards and compliance, ethical sourcing, droughts, fisheries

• Energy: Photosynthesis, warmer climates, fossil fuels, renewable energies, climate change, carbon storage, greenhouse gas emissions, decarbonisation, transportation

• Land-Use: Deforestation, desertification, forestry, woodland and grasslands, farming and agriculture, natural capital converted to human capital, urbanisation, food supply chains, agribusiness, synthetic fertilisers, soil degradation

• Materials and Waste: Synthetic chemicals and hazardous substances, raw materials extraction and natural resources, recycling, single-use plastics, circular material flow, landfill

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, systems thinking, critical thinking, environmental citizenship, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach,

How does sustainability relate to Civil and Structural Engineering?

Civil engineering is a major part of the economy, but is also an industry that consumes many resources that have a damaging effect on the environment . There has been increasing awareness of the impact of carbon emissions, and therefore, construction companies have looked towards sustainable solutions to reduce their carbon footprint during construction and throughout maintenance. Sustainable engineering involves the use of environmentally friendly materials that are either carbon neutral or reduce waste. Recycling is another core component of sustainable civil engineering in ensuring that resources are consumed efficiently and re-used at any given opportunity. Renovating and retrofitting buildings to be more sustainable can reduce environmental impact and sustainable engineering also encompasses the actual construction process by sourcing local products and using renewable energy. It is imperative civil engineering graduates understand the causes of climate change and the sustainable solutions to ensure renewable energy projects meet the needs of the public but also mitigate environmental impacts.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Civil and Structural Engineering curriculum include:

• Resource Use: Efficient waste management, water consumption, sheep wool for insulation, manufactured sand (M-Sand), prefabricated components, noise pollution

• Carbon Emissions: Energy consumption, renewable energy projects, climate change mitigation and adaptation, climate justice, emissions from vehicles and machinery during construction and maintenance, on-site renewable energy generation, carbon offsetting

• Recycling: Reducing landfill materials, single-use plastics, waste and pollutants into water or soil, soil degradation and contamination

• Biodiversity: Land degradation, preserving ecosystems, ecology and conservation, restoring natural habitats, reforesting, environmental charities

• Regulation and Compliance: Environmental impact assessments, hybrid Bills, planning permission, EU Directives, benchmarks, standards, BREEAM and LEED, sustainability assessment, assurance and transparency, Climate Change Act (2008)

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, systems thinking, teamwork, critical thinking, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions, technological design

How does sustainability relate to Electronics and Electrical Engineering?

Sustainable engineering is the process of using sustainable materials and methods to create long-lasting products that can be reused or recycled, ultimately fostering a sustainable way to build and use technology. Many electronic products on the market today are made from valuable resources and highly engineered materials containing many chemicals known to cause issues to human health. Subsequently, managing the waste of these materials requires an innovative, closed-loop approach to reduce the environmental impact of a product’s lifecycle. Sustainable electrical engineering encompasses renewable energy systems that mitigate climate change by reducing the reliance on fossil fuels. Combining renewable energy generation with an environmentally focused supply chain can ensure the electronics industry minimises adverse environmental and social effects. Therefore, graduates pursuing a career in electronics will be required to understand sustainability to manage these rising challenges amid a global economy reliant on electrical products and electricity generation.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Electronics and Electrical Engineering curriculum include:

• Eco-Design: Environmentally-benign materials, reusability and recyclability, lifecycle analysis, technological innovation, energy efficiency, reducing disposal, single-use plastics

• Waste Management: Reusing products in closed-loops, replacing toxic materials, maximising human health, managing chemicals seeping into the environment, recovery of materials into biofuels, over-moulding, environmental impact assessments

• Carbon Footprint: Efficient supply chain management, transportation and distribution of goods, fossil fuel production, electric vehicle industry, on-site energy consumption, air quality, Climate Change Act (2008), mitigating climate change

• Renewable Energy: Integrating renewables into the grid, energy resource management, environmental impact assessments, heating and cooling systems, LED lighting, regulatory frameworks and planning permission, off-shore and on-shore, fossil fuel production

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, environmental citizenship, critical thinking, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions

How does sustainability relate to Energy Engineering?

As global population rises and severity of environmental problems intensifies, much of engineering today involves solving the problems of engineering in the past. This should not be considered a burden, but rather an opportunity to avoid making the same mistakes again. Progressing renewable energy is one avenue to mitigate global crises like climate change, while meeting the demands of a growing economy dependent on energy production . The conversion from fossil fuels to renewable sources isn’t a simple task, considering the wickedness of climate change and complexity of the energy market . However, sustainability ensures that resources are sourced and consumed efficiently and equitably, and therefore, it is imperative engineering graduates understand the costs and benefits of energy production and consumption from environmental, social and economic perspectives. Engineering graduates will be the future leaders of sustainable design and construction with the skills to configure the necessary innovative solutions to these all-encompassing global challenges.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Energy Engineering curriculum include:

• Energy Consumption: Retrofitted housing, domestic and commercial, energy procurement, fuel poverty and homelessness, energy efficiency, sustainable eco-design, LED lighting

• Biofuels: Land degradation, desertification, carbon emissions, feedstocks, biodiversity, rural manufacturing jobs, health and safety, land use and deforestation, agriculture, transport emissions, air quality, fuel taxes/subsidies, socio-economic benefits, anaerobic digestion

• Compliance: Policy and regulation, LEED and BREEAM, sustainable eco-design, Passivhaus, energy auditing, ISO14001 and ISO50001, legal frameworks, assurance

• Renewable Energy: Power generation, offshore and onshore wind, energy utilisation (heat and cooling), multi-scale solar energy systems, co-generation energy

• Climate Change: Fracking and nuclear, fossil fuel production, climate justice, carbon capture and storage, carbon pricing, regulation and compliance, Climate Change Act (2008)

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, environmental citizenship, critical thinking, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions

How does sustainability relate to Food and Process Engineering?

Sustainable food processing focuses on a system orientated approach to food production, taking into considering the total value chain within environmental, economic and social perspectives. The food supply chain is a complex network of activities that include farming processing, distribution, retailing, catering and consumer handling and embedding sustainability within this process adds to the complexity . Following greater public awareness and the need to comply with standards, food industry organisations have had to ensure that operations are conducted in a sustainable and ethical manner. Sustainable food production is based on the use of low energy, reducing waste and minimising single use plastics in packaging, minimal carbon emissions through low-impact processing schemes and to produce quality food with nutritional value close to that of a fresh product . Therefore, as global demand for sustainably sourced food increases, food and process engineering graduates will need to demonstrate a core understanding of sustainability and how food can be produced and distributed with minimal environmental and social impacts.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Food and Process Engineering curriculum include:

• Carbon Emissions: Distributing the product, fossil fuels, supermarket energy consumption, renewable energy, air miles, deforestation (palm oil and soya), climate change mitigation, electric vehicle fleet and charging points

• Waste Management and Recycling: Single-use plastics in packaging, minimising food waste, improving product yields, product recalls, monitor and measure product lifecycles,

• Standards and Compliance: Modern slavery, animal welfare, human rights, fair trade, agriculture and smallholder farmers, ethical sourcing, product labelling, environmental reporting, assurance and transparency, International Standards Organisation

• Community Development: Local raw materials and ingredients, preserve local food civilisation, environmental charities, health and wellbeing, removing additives, obesity and diabetes, sugar tax, food banks and homelessness

• Sustainable Technologies: Vacuum packaging, aerofoil fridges, lower cost of technology application, eco-design, innovation, anaerobic digestion, low carbon technology, rainwater technology, renewable energy, technological transfer

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, systems thinking, teamwork, critical thinking, environmental citizenship, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions, technological design

How does sustainability relate to Business Management and Leadership?

As awareness of climate change, resource scarcity, and social inequality rises organisations at all levels are being held accountable to enact top-down sustainable change. This requires a change of thinking and a change of attitude that usually needs to start with leadership . Future business leaders can embed sustainability within organisations through environmental descriptive norms, transformational leadership and workplace behaviours . Changing the organisational culture to be more sustainably-focused will involve balancing the needs of stakeholders with making profit and protecting the planet. Therefore, learning about sustainability within a business change management context enables students to think innovatively when applying solutions to complex processes and generates inter-disciplinary awareness of global challenges.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Business Management and Leadership curriculum include:

• Health and Wellbeing: Ergonomics, stress, anxiety and depression, green spaces, community volunteering, maternity/paternity leave and gender quality, human resources

• Corporate Social Responsibility: Recycling and waste management, single-use plastics, philanthropy and volunteering, inclusive and diverse employability, circular economy, ethical sourcing (fair trade), modern slavery and human rights, animal welfare

• Assurance and Reporting: Standards and compliance, transparency of practices and operations, greenwashing, unsustainable business scandals and consumer behaviour, industrial environmental reports and sustainability strategies, fair advertising

• Management and Law: Business compliance with environmental and international law, EU environmental directives, policy change and governance, Climate Change Act (2008)

• Carbon Emissions: Indirect pollution (consumption), direct pollution (production), on-site renewable energy, colleague travel behaviours, carbon offsetting, sustainable procurement (e.g. locally sourced), climate emergencies, sustainable technologies

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies:

Systems thinking, uncertainty, normative understanding, strategic response, innovation, empathic leadership, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem-solving, critical-thinking

How does sustainability relate to Human Resources?

Within a competitive business environment, HR teams are the key to a healthy employer and employee relationship acting as the glue throughout business operations. Through training, development and engagement between managers and colleagues, HR can improve the awareness of sustainability issues and increase the uptake of pro-environmental behaviour in the workplace, HR can promote sustainability from the top-down and generate an organisational culture that prioritises sustainable values through corporate social responsibility. Management graduates with an integrated and interdisciplinary understanding of sustainability can be future change agents that implement and embed sustainability throughout organisations in line with other sustainable business frameworks taught within the curriculum. Sustainability enables business leaders to understand complex systems, approach issues with a forward-thinking mindset and have the ability to be able to develop innovative solutions.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Human Resources curriculum include:

• Awareness and Engagement: Sustainability training and education, environmental reporting, assurance and transparency, communications, newsletters and webinars, employee empowerment (sustainability improvements), organisational change

• Wellbeing and Ergonomics: Working from home, stress, anxiety and depression, regular breaks and holidays, shorter working week, maternity and paternity leave, happiness and wellbeing, office lighting, green spaces, comfort, dress-down days

• Behavioural Change: Recycling and waste, energy consumption, travel behaviours, infrastructure, public transport, vegetarian food options, cycle-to-work scheme, sustainable travel incentives, plant-based diet, reducing single-use plastics, volunteering opportunities

• Procurement: Locally sourced products, sustainable energy, carbon emissions and climate change, human rights and modern slavery, standards and compliance, biodegradable and recyclable, energy-intensive production

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, strategic response, innovation, empathic leadership, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem-solving, critical thinking, collaboration

How does sustainability relate to Marketing?

Marketing can play a pivotal role in developing more sustainable systems of production and consumption within our societies in the future. In the 21st century, purchasing products from around the world is considered normality for the consumer and marketing practices within industry supply chains will strongly influence the sustainability of consumer goods. Extensive global supply chains and increases in consumption incur various socio-ecological costs, from air pollution to obesity. There are many examples of unsustainable business practices, but an increasing amount of companies are embedding sustainability throughout operations, and in their products too. Therefore, future business leaders need to understand the positive impact of marketing in increasing transparency and improving the understanding of ethical supply chain practices.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Marketing curriculum include:

• Ethical Sourcing: Working conditions in developing nations, supply chain compliance, standards and fair trade, animal welfare, modern slavery and human rights

• Sustainable Consumption: Recycling and waste management, renewable energy consumption, unsustainable travel behaviours, environmentally benign products (e.g. locally sourced), fast fashion and throw-away culture, circular economy, indirect carbon emissions

• Assurance and Reporting: Standards and compliance, transparency of practices and operations, greenwashing, unsustainable business scandals and consumer behaviour, industrial environmental reports and sustainability strategies, fair advertising

• Management and Law: Business compliance with environmental and international law, EU environmental directives, policy change and governance, Climate Change Act (2008)

• Health & Wellbeing: Advertising and framing, health effects of tobacco and alcohol, obesity/diabetes, promotion of motor industry (e.g. emissions and air quality), active products and services, retail therapy and happiness, de-growth and wellbeing

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, uncertainty, normative understanding, strategic response, innovation, empathic leadership, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem solving, critical thinking

How does sustainability relate to Psychology?

The psychology of sustainability sees sustainability not only in terms of the ecological and socio-economic environment but also in terms of improving the quality of life and wellbeing of society. The root causes of environmental problems lie squarely within the domain of psychological science. Therefore, psychology of sustainability calls for new awareness of the need to achieve sustainable wellbeing from a primary prevention point of view, but to also understand the behavioural science behind unsustainable decision-making both at home and in the workplace . This involves designing and constructing organisational development and wellbeing through the promotion of relationships within the workplace to breakdown barriers of gender equality and establish a culture of inclusivity. Psychology departments must play a key role in preparing students to lead the world toward a more sustainable future, by understanding the importance of social sustainability compiled within happiness and wellbeing .

Sustainability topics relevant to the Psychology curriculum include:

• Happiness and Wellbeing: Stress and anxiety, maternity and paternity leave, gender equality, death and suicide, healthcare, preventing disease, air quality

• Ergonomics: Shorter working week, volunteering opportunities, employee empowerment, office comforts, workload, green spaces, holiday pay, trade unions

• Behavioural Change: Recycling and waste, energy consumption, travel behaviours, available infrastructure, feedback and monitoring, executive leadership, information and awareness, sustainable incentives, organisational culture, values, attitudes

• Community Development: Environmental charities, public space and amenities, recreation areas and green spaces, employment opportunities, equal education

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Data analysis, systems thinking, emotive connection, teamwork, critical thinking, environmental citizenship, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions

How does sustainability relate to Graphic and Communication Design?

Sustainable design refers to the process where environmental and social impacts are minimised to mitigate global challenges such as climate change and waste management. Despite being accused of “greenwashing”, many companies have implemented sustainable design guidelines to lower the consumption of resources and to recycle existing products and materials . Sustainable graphic designers need to consider the entire lifecycle of products, which encompasses the delivery, production and ideation stages . Key sustainability issues within graphic design include the increasing use of paper and the impact of trees, volatile organic compounds, toxic heavy metals and the indirect emissions associated with different materials . These directly contribute to climate change and there is a general lack of response from industry. This is emphasised by a group of passionate graphic designers that have collaborated to form the #ProtestByDesign movement – a collective call to action to creatively voice concerns regarding the ongoing climate crisis. This highlights the necessity for graphic design graduates to understand the scope of their actions and to inspire them to implement pro-environmental practices in their workplace and local community.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Graphic and Communication Design curriculum include:

• Waste Management: Paper consumption and deforestation, recycling, toxic heavy metals (lead, cadmium and barium), waste ink during printing, chlorine-free paper,

• Climate Change: Carbon footprint, carbon emissions or greenhouse gases, volatile organic compounds and photochemical smog, climate justice, renewable energy,

• Workplace Conditions: Monitoring environmental performance, sustainability scorecards, energy consumption, LED lighting, behavioural change, active travel, feedback, health and wellbeing, air conditioning, sustainable energy sources, sustainable technology

• Product Lifecycle: Indirect (manufacturing) and direct (transportation) carbon emissions, “reduce, reuse and recycle”, innovation and collaboration, greenwashing, certification, standards and compliance, supply chain management

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Creativity, systems thinking, technological innovation, interdisciplinary approaches, future thinking, problem-based learning, critical thinking

How does sustainability relate to Veterinary Science?

The concept of sustainable veterinary medicine challenges the misconception that animals are commodities that can be traded and exploited amid a growing global economy . Sustainability impacts veterinary science on a large scale, whereby an ethical and sustainable food supply needs to safeguard social hunger while maintaining animal welfare and biodiversity . On the one hand, antibiotics, steroids and vitamin supplements are studied by veterinary scientists to prevent disease and illness within livestock. However, these traditional remedies also have negative outcomes in human health such as antibiotic resistance. Veterinarians are expected to deal with these risks and uncertainties of animal welfare and human health, but also need to take account of the potential impact of their actions on their patients, clients and the environment . Therefore, veterinary science students with a holistic understanding of sustainability will appreciate these importance of these issues and have the skills to form a proactive response.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Veterinary Science curriculum include:

• Technology: Energy efficiency, carbon emissions (commuting and energy), eco-design, LED lighting, renewable energy, heating and cooling, telemedicine and eHealth

• Animal Ethics and Welfare: Biodiversity, species extinction, poor living conditions, organic and free-range produce, standards and compliance, certificates, intensive farming, environmental charities, veganism, land-use and deforestation, euthanasia

• Waste Management: Single-use plastics, recycling, disposal and collection methods, hazardous waste, labelling and coding, waste segregation, sharps, pharmaceutical waste,

• Health and Wellbeing: Disease prevention, antibiotic resistence, vaccines, traditional therapies, mental health and depression (patients and staff), mindfulness and Wellness

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, technological innovation, interdisciplinary approaches, teamwork, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem-based learning, critical-thinking, collaboration

How does sustainability relate to Business Management and Marketing?

In the 21st century, purchasing products from far and wide is considered normality for the consumer. But extensive global supply chains and increases in consumption come at a cost, whether it be air pollution, modern slavery, unethical sourcing practices or misleading advertising. There are many examples of unsustainable business practices, but an increasing amount of companies are looking to embed sustainability throughout their operations and in their products too. Therefore, future business leaders will need to understand the positive impact marketing can have in increasing transparency to ensure consumers have a clear understanding of ethical supply chain practices.

Topics relevant to sustainability in the Business Management and Marketing curriculum include:

• Ethical Sourcing: Supply chain compliance, different types of standards, fair trade (suppliers and smallholder farmers), animal welfare, modern slavery, carbon emissions throughout supply and value chains, good working conditions

• Sustainable Consumption: Unsustainable consuming behaviours, advertising unsustainable travel (e.g. holidays, driving), socially and environmentally benign products, locally sourced, fast fashion and throw-away culture, sustainable food

• Fair Advertising: Environmental reporting against advertising and assurance, transparency of practices and operations; case studies like VW and Nestle – e.g. how did this affect consumer behaviour? Did their shares go down? What was the business response strategy?

• Management & Law: Business compliance with environmental and international law, alternative organisational management strategies

• Health & Wellbeing: Framing, tobacco and alcohol, sugar and obesity/diabetes, promotion of motor industry (emissions and air quality), promoting sustainable behaviour through active products and service, retail therapy and happiness, de-growth and wellbeing

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies:
Systems thinking, uncertainty, normative understanding, strategic response, innovation, empathic leadership, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem solving, critical-thinking

How does sustainability relate to Business Management and Leadership?

As awareness of climate change, resource scarcity, and social inequality rises organisations at all levels are being held accountable to enact top-down sustainable change. This requires a change of thinking and a change of attitude that usually needs to start with leadership . Future business leaders can embed sustainability within organisations through environmental descriptive norms, transformational leadership and workplace behaviours . Changing the organisational culture to be more sustainably-focused will involve balancing the needs of stakeholders with making profit and protecting the planet. Therefore, learning about sustainability within a business change management context enables students to think innovatively when applying solutions to complex processes and generates inter-disciplinary awareness of global challenges.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Business Management and Leadership curriculum include:

• Health and Wellbeing: Ergonomics, stress, anxiety and depression, green spaces, community volunteering, maternity/paternity leave and gender quality, human resources

• Corporate Social Responsibility: Recycling and waste management, single-use plastics, philanthropy and volunteering, inclusive and diverse employability, circular econom, ethical sourcing (fair trade), modern slavery and human rights, animal welfare

• Assurance and Reporting: Standards and compliance, transparency of practices and operations, greenwashing, unsustainable business scandals and consumer behaviour, industrial environmental reports and sustainability strategies, fair advertising

• Management and Law: Business compliance with environmental and international law, EU environmental directives, policy change and governance, Climate Change Act (2008)

• Carbon Emissions: Indirect pollution (consumption), direct pollution (production), on-site renewable energy, colleague travel behaviours, carbon offsetting, sustainable procurement (e.g. locally sourced), climate emergencies, sustainable technologies

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies:

Systems thinking, uncertainty, normative understanding, strategic response, innovation, empathic leadership, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem solving, critical-thinking

How does sustainability relate to Dentistry and Dental Hygiene?

As a profession, dentistry has potential to integrate sustainability into daily practice and support a shift to a sustainable economy in the pursuit of healthy lives and wellbeing for all. Dental services have an important opportunity to address the sustainability of services – from the design of the clinical pathway, to the organisation and delivery of care . The NHS contributes to approximately 4.5% of the UK’s carbon emissions, emphasising the capacity for change from an organisational perspective. Dentistry consumes resources at an unsustainable rate and its carbon footprint is more inflated compared to other NHS sectors due to patient visits and procurement. Therefore, dentistry plays a central role in sustainable healthcare and future dentists will need the innovation and problem-solving skills to ensure dental practices maintain patient care, but to also mitigate climate change and manage waste by reducing carbon footprints and using resources more efficiently.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Dentistry and Dental Hygiene curriculum include:

• Health and Wellbeing: Prevention of disease, hygiene, stress and anxiety, obesity and diabetes, availability of sugar-free food products, delivery of care, availability of services

• Procurement: Local and ethically sourced products, transport of goods and laboratory items, carbon footprint of different items, storage, product lifecycle

• Recycling and Waste: Single-use plastics, disposable and reusable products, water consumption, sustainable dental materials (biodegradable or recyclable), consuming resources more efficiently, sustainable technologies

• Carbon Footprint: Mitigating climate change, reducing energy consumption, low-power and low-pollution technologies, travel behaviours of staff and patients (public transport infrastructure), carbon modelling, EV charging points, scale and polish

• Green Space: Sustainable gardens at practices, enhances local biodiversity, improves patient wellbeing and happiness, natural capital and carbon storage

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, uncertainty, normative understanding, strategic response, innovation, empathic leadership, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem solving, critical-thinking, collaboration

How does sustainability relate to Computing and Information Technology?

Computing has been held to account for contributing to climate change, but can also be seen as the technological solution to the most pressing sustainable challenges. The impact of IT on the environment is reflected in the pressure for companies to adopt sustainable IT strategies, and reduce their carbon footprints, which have consequential financial impacts through taxation. For example, computing and mobile technology have a larger footprint than the aviation industry, although IT can also reduce levels of consumption through cloud infrastructure that tackles energy and resource efficiency through self-service and pay-per-use initiatives.

Nevertheless, sustainable computing can potentially reverse biodiversity, identify patterns of deforestation and record local inequality issues. Plus it involves the manufacture, transport and disposal of equipment to have a reduced environmental impact. Therefore, while computing produces carbon emissions, IT can also provide technologically innovative solutions. Embedding sustainability in the computer science curriculum develops employability skills so that efficient solutions can respond to rising global challenges.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Computing and Information Technology curriculum include:

• Cloud Infrastructure: Resource efficiency, networks, pay-as-you-go, reducing energy consumption, purchasing sustainable energy, economic savings,

• Energy and Carbon Management: Climate change, carbon emissions/footprint, energy consumption, climate justice, carbon storage, renewable energy sources, data storage and servers, policy and governance, standards and compliance

• Sustainable Design: Network deployment, social media, hardware and software design, user interaction, telecommunication networks, reversing biodiversity, identifying deforestation, satellite imaging, innovation, collaboration with business

• Recycling and Waste: Throw-away culture, disposal of computing equipment, hazardous waste, single-use plastics, indirect carbon emissions (manufacturing and transport)

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, technological innovation, interdisciplinary approaches, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem-based learning, critical thinking, collaboration

How does sustainability relate to Aviation, Aeronautical and Aerospace Engineering?

Following the rising demand for air travel, the environmental impacts of the global aviation industry have been widely reported as carbon emissions have heavily contributed to the proliferation of atmospheric climate change. Extremist climate action groups call for an end to aviation, but the industry is making headway in committing to a sustainable future. Aircraft engines are being innovatively designed to limit emission levels and reduce the amount of noise, while aviation companies have demonstrated environmental awareness through carbon offsetting . In addition, there are a number of other challenges away from climate change in making the aviation industry sustainable, which also include waste management, recycling and reducing single use plastics, promoting health and good air quality . Therefore, graduates with an understanding and appreciation of sustainability will have the skillset and vision to implement the complex and necessary solutions to reduce environmental and social impacts of the aviation industry.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Aviation, Aeronautical and Aerospace curriculum include:

• Carbon Emissions: Fuel efficiency, biofuels and plant-based fuel sources, electric aircrafts, climate change, climate justice, domestic flights, energy consumption, LED lighting, carbon footprints, carbon offsetting and reforestation, renewable energy

• Local Impacts: Aircraft noise, pollution and air quality, increased traffic congestion, raising awareness, runway extensions, health and wellbeing

• Waste Management and Recycling: Food waste, single-use plastics, recycling opportunities, feedback and labelling, recycling aircraft systems and cabins, reducing in-flight and airport waste (educating commuters), sustainable procurement

• Community Development: Local employment, improvements to public transport, tourism and economic development, infrastructure links, corporate social responsibility, business

• Eco-Design: Sustainable technologies, electric aircraft, alternative fuel sources, sustainable design of airports, reducing energy consumption, increasing biodiversity, green spaces

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, environmental citizenship, critical thinking, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions

How does sustainability relate to Materials Science and Engineering?

Materials production and consumption has resulted in environmental concerns in a variety of domains, such as biodiversity, land-use degradation, waste generation, decreased water quality, climate impacts and biogeochemical flows . Most impacts during materials use originate from the fuel and electricity needed to power machine, but mitigating these impacts is urgent, complex and requires multidisciplinary systems approaches. Materials engineering is particularly important for addressing sustainability, since materials engineers are involved both in the production and processing of materials with low energy use and low environmental impact (supply side) as well as in the selection of materials (demand side) . Therefore learning about sustainable energy technology, life-cycle analysis and mineral resources is becoming increasingly important for materials science and engineering students.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Materials Science and Engineering curriculum include:

• Carbon Emissions: Energy consumption, renewable energy projects, climate change mitigation and adaptation, climate justice, emissions from vehicles and machineries during construction and maintenance, on-site renewable energy generation, carbon offsetting

• Land Use: Desertification, landscape degradation, deforestation, biodiversity loss, environmental impact assessments, hazardous and radioactive materials, water quality

• Biodiversity: Habitat loss, ecology and conservation, preserving and restoring natural habitats, environmental charities

• Waste Management and Recycling: Ecosystem pollution, single-use plastics, soil contamination, resource use and waste, lifecycle analysis, biodegradable materials, reducing landfill materials

• Resource Use: Efficient waste management, water consumption, sheep wool for insulation, manufactured sand (M-Sand), prefabricated components, noise pollution

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, systems thinking, teamwork, critical thinking, environmental citizenship, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions, technological design

How does sustainability relate to Nuclear Engineering?

As the global population rises and the severity of environmental problems intensifies, much of engineering today involves solving the problems of engineering in the past. This should not be considered a burden, but rather an opportunity to avoid making the same mistakes again. Progressing renewable energy and developing nuclear power can mitigate global crises like climate change, while meeting the demands of a growing economy dependent on energy production. The conversion from fossil fuels to more sustainable sources isn’t a simple task, considering the wickedness of climate change and complexity of the energy market . However, sustainable engineering ensures that resources are sourced and consumed efficiently and equitably, and therefore, it is imperative engineering graduates understand the costs and benefits of energy production and consumption from environmental, social and economic perspectives. Engineering graduates will be the future leaders of sustainable design and construction with the skills to configure the necessary innovative solutions to these all-encompassing global challenges.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Nuclear Engineering curriculum include:

• Energy Consumption: Retrofitted housing, domestic and commercial, energy procurement, fuel poverty and homelessness, energy efficiency, sustainable eco-design, LED lighting

• Biofuels: Land degradation, desertification, carbon emissions, feedstocks, biodiversity, rural manufacturing jobs, health and safety, land use and deforestation, agriculture, transport emissions, air quality, fuel taxes/subsidies, socio-economic benefits, anaerobic digestion

• Compliance: Policy and regulation, LEED and BREEAM, sustainable eco-design, Passivhaus, energy auditing, ISO14001 and ISO50001, legal frameworks, assurance

• Health and Safety: Radioactive material, on-site health and safety, training and education, soil and water contamination, storing radioactive waste and decay time, weapon proliferation and terror, diseases and genetic disorders, lung cancer and poor air quality

• Climate Change: Fracking, renewable energy fossil fuel production, climate justice, carbon capture and storage, carbon pricing, regulation and compliance, Climate Change Act (2008)

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, innovation, systems thinking, teamwork, critical thinking, interdisciplinary and collaborative approach, creative solutions, technological design

How does sustainability relate to Food Science and Nutrition?

Some studies predict that 30% more food needs to be produced by 2050 to meet the demands of global population increase . Yet, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation roughly 800 million people in the world currently do not have enough food to live a healthy life . Evidently, nutrition is central to sustainable development, as innovative technology will need to be applied to ensure that future food production is conducted in an ethically sustainable fashion. Nutrition and sustainability are inextricably linked, as rising issues like veganism, ethical sourcing, genetically modified produce and animal welfare are becoming widely reported in mainstream and social media. Therefore, a key understanding of sustainability will equip graduates with knowledge and resilience to innovatively solve these pressing social and environmental issues.

Topics relevant to sustainability already in the Food and Nutrition curriculum include:

• Public Health: Impacts of obesity and diabetes, happiness and wellbeing, exercise, using marketing to promote healthy lifestyles, domestically grown food, preventing disease

• Waste Management: Reductions in plastic packaging and impact on consumer behaviour, household and organisational food waste, food banks and homelessness, water quality

• Agriculture: Pesticides usage, intensive agriculture, animal welfare, genetically modified organisms, locally sourced food, economic development, fair trade, ethical sourcing, working conditions, standards and compliance, modern slavery

• Environmental Impact: Biodiversity loss and enhancement, carbon emissions of cattle production, carbon footprint of global food system, plant-based diet, soil degradation, climate change, energy consumption, water pollution, desertification

• Sustainable Organisations: Fast food economy, imported vs. home-grown, Brexit and trade, corporate social responsibility, sustainable supermarkets, Incredible Edible

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Future thinking, systems thinking, anticipatory, normative understanding, collaboration, innovation, critical thinking, decision-making, problem-solving, inter-disciplinary, teamwork, debate and reasoning

How does sustainability relate to Healthcare and Health Sciences?

Healthcare systems are complex and involve having to balance competing priorities in patient care, cost efficiency and environmental impact. The latter is becoming an increasingly important aspect in health delivery, given the rise in awareness of sustainability issues that impact public health – specifically climate change and air quality . Central strategies such as the NHS Long Term Plan have given weight to sustainability issues, as foundation trusts in Newcastle and Manchester have declared climate emergencies. From clinical waste to single-use plastics, there are various sustainability issues related to healthcare, and therefore, future Health Science graduates will need to be equipped with the skills and knowledge to handle these challenges accordingly.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Healthcare and Health Sciences curriculum include:

• Procurement: Locally sourced food, carbon footprint of medical products, collaborating with SMEs, provide to the local economy, comply with modern slavery,

• Recycling and Waste: Single-use plastics, clinical waste, availability of sustainable infrastructure, behaviour change (convenience), innovative technology and design, executive support and leadership, feedback and demonstration, cost benefits of waste management

• Carbon Footprint: Energy consumption, travel behaviours (staff, patients, visitors), public transport links to hospitals/trusts, climate change impacts (i.e. flooding, the spread of disease, heatwaves), measuring environmental performance, eHealth, electric fleet, air quality

• Social Impact: Reducing the client base (resource reduction and cost improvements), green space and patient wellbeing, preventing disease, community development and cohesion, social value, reducing inequalities, happiness and better quality of life

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, uncertainty, normative understanding, strategic response, innovation, empathic leadership, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem-solving, critical thinking, collaboration

How does sustainability relate to Human Resources?

Within a competitive business environment, HE teams are the key to a healthy employer and employee relationship acting as the glue throughout business operations. Through training, development and engagement between managers and colleagues, HE can improve the awareness of sustainability issues and to increase the uptake of pro-environmental behaviour in the workplace , HR can promote sustainability from the top-down and generate an organisational culture that prioritises sustainable values through corporate social responsibility . Management graduates with an integrated and interdisciplinary understanding of sustainability can be future change agents that implement and embed sustainability throughout organisations in line with other sustainable business frameworks taught within the curriculum. Sustainability enables business leaders to understand complex systems, approach issues with a forward-thinking mindset and have the ability to be able to develop innovative solutions.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Human Resources curriculum include:

• Awareness and Engagement: Sustainability training and education, environmental reporting, assurance and transparency, communications, newsletters and webinars, employee empowerment (sustainability improvements), organisational change

• Ergonomics: Working from home, stress, anxiety and depression, regular breaks and holidays, shorter working week, maternity and paternity leave, happiness and wellbeing, office lighting, green spaces, comfort, dress-down days

• Behavioural Change: Recycling and waste, energy consumption, travel behaviours, infrastructure, public transport, vegetarian food options, cycle-to-work scheme, sustainable travel incentives, plant-based diet, reducing single-use plastics, volunteering opportunities

• Procurement: Locally sourced products, sustainable energy, carbon emissions and climate change, human rights and modern slavery, standards and compliance, biodegradable and recyclable, energy-intensive production

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, strategic response, innovation, empathic leadership, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem-solving, critical thinking, collaboration

How does sustainability relate to Criminal Justice and Criminology?

Sustainable criminology is the analysis of environmental harm from a criminological perspective, which considers offences, offenders and victims of environmental crime. There are various examples of environmental crime, such as preventing adequate action to mitigate climate change and the perpetrators . Other examples include dumping toxic waste, trafficking or poaching endangered species, illegally felling trees and forests . There have been numerous responses to environmental crime from the formation of standards and certifications, to national policies like the Climate Change Act (2008). The Sustainable Development Goals [SDGs] outlined crime as a core aspect, whereby SDG16 aims to reduce the threat of crime and violence while enhancing the delivery of justice and security throughout the Global South . In addition, violence against women is central to sustainable criminology and aligns with SDG5. Therefore, as the awareness of sustainability issues like climate change and plastic waste increases, criminology graduates will be required to understand the legal responses to breaches in environmental crime.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Criminal Justice and Criminology curriculum include:

• Environmental Law: Standards and compliance, EU directives, Climate Change Act (2008), Kyoto Protocol, United Nations, policy and governance, taxes and subsidies, cap and trade

• Biodiversity: Deforestation, species extinction, illegal poaching, trophy hunting, wildlife trafficking, animal welfare, conservation, environmental charities, protected zones,

• Climate Change: Carbon emissions, offsetting, climate justice, fossil fuels, renewable energy, aviation industry, globalisation and neoliberalism

• Activism: Climate-gate, youth strike movement, Extinction Rebellion, collective action, social media, civil society, riots and protests, climate justice, gender quality

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, interdisciplinary approaches, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem-based learning, teamwork, critical-thinking, collaboration

How does sustainability relate to Transport Studies?

Sustainable transport is the capacity to support the mobility of a society in a way that does not damage the environment and does not impair the mobility needs of future generations. Transportation supports the interaction and development of the socioeconomic system, but has also inflicted various environmental impacts due to the burning of fossil fuels. Within the current economy, individuals depend on automobiles and global air travel has become the norm for business and pleasure. Therefore, sustainable transportation considers alternatives and solutions to the environmentally damaging transport patterns of modern business. To ensure the ecological limits remain intact, the ebbs and flows of business and commerce need to be conducted in a sustainable manner amid rising transport demands. It is essential that future transport graduates have a core understanding of sustainability, as fossil fuels are slowly being phased out in favour of renewable sources, but to also be aware of the social benefits of sustainable transport. It is not just about making travel more sustainable, but sustainability is about making people healthier too.

Sustainability topics relevant to the Transport curriculum include:

• Carbon Emissions: Electric vehicles and charging points, climate change adaptation and mitigation, biofuels, fossil fuels, petroleum taxes and subsidies, oil crisis, climate justice, aviation and automobile industry, quality of life, air quality

• Public Transport: Green spaces, health benefits of active travel, car share, technological innovation, more affordable public transport, tram networks, cycle lanes, park and ride

• Sustainable Cities: Cycle lanes, road closures, air quality, working from home, video conferences, public transport infrastructure, health and safety, eco-design, sustainable jobs, urban studies, zero-carbon, pedestrianised streets

• Policy and Governance: Clean air zones, congestion charge, local authorities, EU directives, Climate Change Act (2008), Paris Agreement, civil society and climate action, Kyoto Protocol, cap and trade (EU Emissions Trading Scheme)

• Behavioural Change: Incentivising sustainable travel, more expensive fuel, carbon taxes, lower car supply, more affordable public transport, cycle-to-work schemes, park and ride

Key Sustainability Skills and Competencies: Systems thinking, technological innovation, interdisciplinary approaches, teamwork, future thinking, risk management, decision-making, problem-solving, critical thinking, collaboration

How does sustainability relate to Chemical and Process Engineering?

Much of the engineering today involves solving the problems faced by engineering in the past. This should not be considered a burden but rather an opportunity to avoid making the same mistakes again. It is not a simple task, considering the complexity and wickedness of global problems (e.g. inequality, poverty, climate change, malnutrition). However, engineering graduates will be the future leaders with the skills to configure the necessary solutions to these all-encompassing problems. Sustainability ensures that resources are sourced and consumed efficiently and equitably, and therefore, it is imperative graduates understand costs and benefits of energy from environmental, social and economic sustainability perspectives.

Topics relevant to sustainability already in the Chemical and Process Engineering:

• Resource Supply/Demand: Recycling and reuse, catalysis, urban mining, single-use plastics, domestic and commercial energy consumption, energy procurement, fuel poverty

• Biofuels: Land degradation, desertification, carbon emissions, feedstocks, biodiversity, rural manufacturing jobs, health and safety, land use and deforestation, agriculture, transport emissions, air quality, fuel taxes/subsidies, socio-economic benefits

• Water Access: Scarcity and sanitation, water pollution, irrigation and management systems, extreme weather patterns, infrastructure, economic development, global poverty, public health and prevention of disease, water treatment,

• Food Supply: Genetically modified, waste, food security, ethical sourcing, poverty, agricultural practices and yields, innovation and technology, cattle production and stem cells

• Climate Change: Renewable energy, fracking and nuclear, carbon capture and storage, carbon pricing, regulation and compliance, adaptation and mitigation

Skills & Competencies:
Lifecycle thinking, systems thinking, consumer awareness, strategic competency, critical thinking, problem-solving, innovation, teamwork and collaboration

Sustainable Careers

The University’s Employability Strategy has sustainability at its heart, ensuring students are provided with an experience that means they are able to provide a meaningful contribution to society and that they have the skills and attributes required to address global issues through their careers.

The University of Leeds is proud that, in implementing their sustainability skills and knowledge, our alumni are involved in delivering all 17 of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). You can read about some of their experiences on the Big Get Together webpages.

Governance

The Leeds Sustainable Curriculum is guided and advised by a Working Group to ensure the University achieves the strategic objectives of:

  • Enhancing and embedding provision across all levels of undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum (highlighting how learning aligns to the UN SDGs)
  • Providing resources to build staff and student knowledge and capacity to enable change
  • Enabling students to learn across disciplinary boundaries and ensure a permanent sustainability teaching offer
  • Developing sustainable ways of structuring, delivering and assessing the Leeds curriculum
  • Supporting all students – regardless of discipline – to conduct independent study with a sustainability-focus
  • Enhancing sustainability content in our educational engagement programmes to inspire and support young people in widening their educational opportunities and empowering them to create change
  • Enabling an increase in global understanding, dialogue and capacity to support delivery of the UN SDGs

The Working Group reports to the University Executive Group via the Sustainability Steering Group. It forms a key element of the Curriculum Redefined Programme.

To find out more or get involved, please get in touch: sustainability@leeds.ac.uk.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

We use the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a framework to guide our activity. Our work on the Leeds sustainable curriculum is linked to all of the SDGs.

Find out more about our impact on the SDGs.